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AAVS Condemns Researchers who Cloned Transgenic Glowing Puppies



Given people's special attachment to dogs and cats, who often share our homes, there should be little tolerance for the activities undertaken and endorsed by the South Korean researchers who cloned a transgenic puppy who glows red under ultraviolet light. It is, quite simply, wasteful and cruel.

The unintended and unexpected side effects of genetic engineering and cloning, and the corresponding concerns for animal welfare, have all been well-documented—in the scientific literature and by advocacy groups. Animals with deformities, abnormalities, and pathologies, and a terribly high likelihood of death (some 97-99% of experiments fail) are all the norm.

Because of this, it typically takes hundreds to thousands of animals to create a "line" of transgenic animals who can be used in a research project, many of whom suffer pain and distress. Adding cloning to the equation, equally inefficient and harmful, only worsens the situation. Then, the whole process would need to be repeated for every different research project. The sheer waste of animal life is staggering.

The story of puppies who glow in the dark might sound like a "fun" weird story of the day, but the suffering involved is real. The general public entrusts scientists to do worthwhile research, but there is no justification for promoting research that would consume thousands upon thousands of dogs for no apparent benefit. Scientists should be ashamed of wasting time, money, and animal lives in this way when there are so many worthy research projects that deserve attention.











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